It’s that time of the year we call Winter. Some people love it, some people hate it and some are ambivalent. Whatever your perception there are thing that you should be aware of and be cautious of, because Winter can be a killer.

Risks related to car accidents, carbon monoxide poisoning and heart attacks are greater in the winter than any other time of the year. Throw in hypothermia, frostbite, freezing rain, and wind chill (or as they call it today Real Feel) and you have a deadly mix.

Here is a simple checklist of things that you should not do or do with extreme caution. This is not all inclusive, but it is a good start on being safe.

  • Don’t drive if you don’t have to and if you do pay attention to you, the cars around you and the road conditions. Black ice sneaks up on you and before you know it your car is out of control
  • Don’t go out if you don’t need to. If you need to wear layers of clothes and protect exposed skin. Frostbite happens in less time than you know.
  • Pets don’t know what’s cold so be aware of their needs and do more frequent short trips than less frequent longer trips.
  • Be prepared for power outages. Have a good supply of canned food, extra blankets, extra batteries and maybe even a lantern and a battery powered radio
  • Don’t use your stove to keep warm
  • Know what the symptoms are for hyperthermia and frostbite
  • Keep the radio or TV on to listen for frequent weather updates
  • Make sure your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are working, test them regularly before you need them
  • Parking lots, bridges and ramps are particularly hazardous and use extreme cautions when driving or walking in these areas.
  • Carry an emergency kit in your car with jumper cables, reflective safety vest, and flare stick.   Some people carry wood chips or sand in the event they get caught in a spot where their tires lose traction.
  • Keep a full tank of gas.  Don’t run the needle down to empty. A full tank also minimizes condensation in the fuel tank which could prevent the proper operation of your vehicle

 

Check out this site for more information and be safe https://www.ready.gov/winter-weather